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Best Pointe Shoes

Unlike regular ballet shoes, pointe shoes are specifically designed to allow ballerinas to dance on the tip of their toes. They have a hardened, flat front rather than a round toe that creates a stable base for balancing with hard shanks and smooth, silky uppers. The styles are secured with ribbons that wrap around the ankle, but most shoes don’t come with them pre-sewn. For shopping made easy, we rounded up some of the best pointe shoes on the market for masters of the art. These picks from top brands offer great support and specialized features for every preference.

1. Capezio Aria Pointe Shoe

Respected dancewear brand Capezio created a top-of-the-line pointe shoe with a broad, feathered toe box.

Pros: For comfort and support, this shoe features a plush inner lining with moisture-absorbing capabilities to reduce irritation and blisters along with a wide anti-slip platform for stability. The reduced sole length eliminates excess at the heel and a side seam elongates the length of the foot.

Cons: The brand suggests this style is best for a broad (Roman) foot.

capezio, pointe shoes
CREDIT: Courtesy of Amazon

2. Russian Pointe Rubin Pointe Shoes

Russian Pointe sets you up for success in these U-cut pointe shoes with a sleek pleatless toe platform and a non-slip leather sole.

Pros: The wide toe box allows these shoes to create a stable base with a pre-arched construction that mimics the natural curve of your foot on pointe, offering ultimate support. The shanks add flexibility and durability while a drawstring finish allows for a customizable fit.

Cons: Ribbons are not included. The brand also advises that this style is best suited to the less-full foot with more square to slightly tapered toes.

russian pointe, rubin shoes, pointe shoes
CREDIT: Courtesy of Amazon

 

3. Grishko 2007 Pointe Shoes

For ballet dancers, Grishko sets you up with a pointe shoe equipped with a medium, flat toe platform and a classical vamp that is a mix between a U-cut and a V-cut.

Pros: Advised for wear for everyone from beginners to professionals, this shoe is an extra light model with a suede stitched sole. It boasts a lack of noise with every movement and makes for a smooth transition from the demi-pointe to the pointe and back. The 3/4 shank allows for a more extenuated arch.

Cons: For some beginners, certain instructors may not allow a 3/4 shank shoe.

grishko, pointe shoes, 2007
CREDIT: Courtesy of Amazon

All products featured have been independently selected and curated by our editorial team. If you buy something through the links included on our site, FN may earn a commission.

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