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Amazon Secures Naming Rights to Seattle Stadium — Here’s What It’ll Be Called

Amazon has secured the naming rights to Seattle’s new downtown stadium.

The e-commerce behemoth announced today that it was calling the 18,100-seat multipurpose space — previously known as KeyArena — the “Climate Pledge Arena,” referencing the company’s ambitious plan to combat climate change. The venue is now home to the city’s NHL team and the Women’s National Basketball Association’s Seattle Storm.

“Instead of naming it after Amazon, we’re calling it Climate Pledge Arena as a regular reminder of the importance of fighting climate change,” founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said in a statement.

According to the Seattle-based online giant, the Climate Change Arena — expected to host 200 events each year — is the first net zero carbon-certified stadium in the world. The space will be powered by 100% renewable electricity and generate zero waste from operations, plus it will use reclaimed rainwater to create the “greenest ice” in the NHL, the company said. (Carbon emissions and the “sustainability performance” of the arena will be measured and publicly disclosed, it added.)

What’s more, both the NHL and WNBA team’s tickets will double as free public transit passes for sports fans. Amazon also said that at least 75% of the arena’s food program will be locally sourced to help support regional farmers and producers, while all unused food from events will be donated to community food programs.

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Last year, Amazon launched The Climate Pledge in response to mounting calls to action from its employees. As part of the initiative, the company promised to achieve net zero carbon use by 2040 — a decade ahead of the Paris Agreement.

This week, the e-tailer released its 2019 sustainability report, which noted that it was on the path to run on 100% renewable energy by 2025 — five years ahead of schedule — and currently working on 91 renewable energy projects around the world. Amazon also said it has made two investments from its $100 million Right Now Climate Fund in “nature-based solutions” and reforestation projects, as well as eliminated more than 880,000 tons of packaging material since 2015.

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