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How the CFDA and ‘Vogue’ Are Helping the Fashion Community Survive the Coronavirus Crisis

The Council of Fashion Designers of America and Vogue today announced a new fundraising initiative to support members of the American fashion community amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The initiative, called A Common Thread, will be accompanied by a video series, which will launch on March 25. The series will tell the stories of those in the fashion industry whose businesses have been hurt by the coronavirus. The videos, about both designers and those who work behind the scenes in the industry, will be posted on the CFDA and Vogue digital platforms.

Donors can support the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund relief online or by texting THREAD to 44-321. Applications to receive funds will be available beginning on Wednesday, April 8 on the CFDA website.

Due to social distancing and government restrictions, many fashion retailers have temporarily closed their doors and many designers have suspended manufacturing. With products including masks, gloves and hospital gowns in short supply, some American designers have offered to use their supply chains, ateliers and factories to make medical supplies. Brandon Maxwell, Prabal Gurung and Christian Siriano are among the U.S.-based designers who are focusing on manufacturing medical goods amid the current crisis.

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Fashion companies have also offered to pitch in financially to help fight the coronavirus. Sarah Flint, Esquivel and Kenneth Cole are among the brands donating a portion of their proceeds to relief efforts, while luxury conglomerates Kering and LVMH have both pledged to donate millions of short-in-supply face masks to French health authorities. And designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, himself a member of the CFDA board, announced that he has turned his New York office into a donation center for N95 masks, gloves and other medical supplies, with his brand, Pyer Moss, contributing $5,000 toward buying these goods. Additionally, Jean-Raymond has set aside $50,000 to help out minority and women-owned businesses during this unprecedented time.

The coronavirus, which causes the disease COVID-19, has infected over 395,000 people worldwide and killed more than 17,200. In the U.S., more than 46,400 people have been sickened and the death toll has climbed to more than 580.

 

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