Nike Signs a Licensing Agreement for NYC Logos

Move aside, Swoosh — Nike now has access to plenty of other logos.

The Beaverton, Ore.-based brand has landed a deal with New York’s tourism company to print more than 30 trademarks from the city on its wares, including T-shirts, sweatpants and shoes.

New York’s Franchise and Concession Committee approved a two-year licensing agreement with the Swoosh on Aug. 14. Logos Nike now has access to include ones from the NYPD, FDNY and a Times Square road sign.

New York City logos
The New York City logos Nike now has access to.
CREDIT: Courtesy of agreement

Per the new contract, the sportswear brand will give 5% of annual revenues on its New York-branded merchandise to the Big Apple’s tourism board, NYC & Company. There’s a guaranteed minimum of $20,000 over the next two years.

An unspecified amount of Big Apple-Nike apparel will go to NYC & Company to give out for promotional purposes. Jane Meyer, a spokesperson for Mayor Bill de Blasio, told The City that revenues will go toward maintaining the cost of the licensing program.

As a partner of the city of New York, Nike will be subject to a series of ethical standards, which includes a ban on forced and child labor. The athletic wear giant will also be required to disclose to the city where its New York-branded products are made and to, whenever a new factory is used, have vendors agree to ethical standards.

While Nike has pledged to adhere to ethical standards, the company has in the past faced criticism for its treatment of workers. In 2012, it was criticized when 300 workers fainted en masse at a Cambodia factory; similar instances of mass fainting had occurred at other facilities in the country.

Student activists at NYU protested Nike’s licensing agreement with their university in April, alleging that the brand had failed to adequately compensate Indonesian workers in 2011 after withdrawing from the country.

Watch the video below to see career and life-changing advice from Saucony’s president, Anne Cavassa.

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