Nike’s Latest Trademark Filing Indicates It May Be Launching Its Own Cryptocurrency

Nike filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to trademark the word “cryptokicks” on April 19.

The trademark would apply to cryptocurrency software and hardware wallets, online marketplace services and virtual financial transaction services. It would also cover “providing online nondownloadable computer software for use as a cryptocurrency wallet; providing a website featuring technology that enables users to mine, earn, purchase, receive by any other means, store, and transfer blockchain-based tokens, coins, cryptocurrencies, and other crypto assets,” the filing stated.

Though Nike’s exact plans for “cryptokicks” are unclear, the filing indicates that it may be launching an online coin of its own, branded under the “cryptokicks” name. While cryptocurrency has yet to be accepted by most major retailers, it has been gaining steam — and major players like Amazon are exploring the possibility of taking on crypto.

“It’s definitely still nascent in the mainstream area, but we are starting to see more firms accepting it, which implies the trend has legs,” Michael Diamond, director of industry analysis for commercial technology at The NPD Group Inc., told FN. “If the big guys are exploring and starting to offer it, more customers are asking for and demanding it, and retailers do not want to get left out in the cold, especially if they have a global presence.”

With its latest trademark filings, the Swoosh seems to be banking big on tech.

It recently applied to trademark “footware” — a term which would cover smart sneakers such as the recently released self-lacing Adapt BB. As the Oregon-based company expands its tech-aided footwear offerings, the “footware” name seems like part of a planned marketing push.

The full trademark application can be viewed on the USPTO website by searching “cryptokicks” through the Trademark Electronic Search System. FN has reached out to Nike for comment.

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