A Look Back at the Top Shoe Moments on YouTube

Thanks to YouTube, some of the greatest and buzziest moments in shoe history are available at the click of a mouse.

Remember when President George W. Bush proved to be deft at dodging loafers? In 2008, Iraqi journalist Muntazer al-Zaidi from the Al-Baghdadia television network hurled a pair of his shoes — one after the other — at the commander in chief during a live press conference. Bush’s response: “All I can report is that it’s a size 10.”

One of the earliest viral videos was an ode to shoes. Actor Liam Kyle Sullivan’s 2006 music video “Shoes” spoofed a woman’s obsession with footwear. The YouTube hit has been viewed nearly 60 million times.

“The girl who had one shoe now has many,” said Mariah Carey in “Cribs,” one of MTV’s most celebrated programs. The series gave an inside look at how showbiz folk live in luxury. In 2002, Carey’s tour of her New York City apartment became iconic and solidified the importance of a celebrity shoe closet. The diva showed off her lavish digs and called particular attention to her boutique-like shoe closet.

“There’s probably 2,000 shoes in that room,” remarked producer Jermaine Dupri, who provided commentary on the video. The singer presented over-the-knee boots that she donned her in “Loverboy” music video and “Pamela” platforms inspired by Pamela Anderson’s then-favored shoe style. Carey was most impressive as she worked up a sweat on her gym’s StairMaster while wearing 4-inch heels. More than a decade later, Carey’s tour remains one of the most watched in the series.

Question: “If you saw a pair of Yeezys on the ground would you go against your morals and try to take them?” In a 2014 YouTube video that has been viewed more than 13 million times, a hidden camera documents how people react when they stumble upon a seemingly abandoned pair of Yeezys.

Proof exists that catwalk queen Naomi Campbell’s signature strut is not perfect. The supermodel was defeated in 1994 by a pair of 9-inch Vivienne Westwood platforms at the designer’s spring show — and in a David Letterman interview one year later, she revisited the famous tumble. In 2007, a YouTube user uploaded the segment that has been watched more than 1.5 million times.

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