3 Questions for Angela Edgeworth

Angela Edgeworth is using the expertise she honed as founder of children’s brand Pediped to tackle the adult footwear market. She’s now setting her sights on clientele base of moms with the spring ’13 launch of women’s brand Brian James.

Based on the same comfort principles as the children’s line, Brian James incorporates such features as padded footbeds and flexible outsoles. Debuting as a capsule collection of two gladiator-inspired sandals and a ballet flat, the line will expand for fall ’13.

“Fall is a fun time,” Edgeworth said. “We’d like to expand into pumps and booties. [However], we are sticking to core styles and classics that we think will go into any woman’s wardrobe. We’re interested in silhouettes our customers can come back to year after year as we do with Pediped.”

Retailing for $98, the shoes will deliver in January/February.

Edgeworth, who divides her days between running her business and caring for her two daughters, shared her plans for the future growth of her company with Footwear News.

1. How do you plan to carve a niche in the comfort market?
AE: A few of our kids’ retailers have picked up the line, [because] moms are already shopping [in their stores]. That’s definitely been a big help for us. [These retailers] know we ship on time and will stand behind our product. There’s [a] comfort level there. We’ll take advantage of those opportunities whenever we can. [Secondly], what we did a lot with Pediped was [implement] grassroots marketing, celebrity outreach and bloggers. We will continue to do that [with Brian James].

2. How would you describe your target customer?
AE: [She’s] stylish, but doesn’t want to give up comfort and is looking for shoes at a reasonable price. She’s of a slightly higher income bracket, educated with at least a college degree or master’s. She researches things and relies heavily on word-of-mouth from her friends and peers. The mom that we have in mind is 28 to 40, but the broader target might be 25 to 45.

3. What’s the biggest difference between designing kids’ and women’s footwear?
AE: I think it’s a little harder to design for kids. In general, kids’ shoes have more components such as embellishments. We have to think of the different age groups. What a baby will wear is different from what a 3-year-old will wear, which is different from what the 7 or 8-year-old child is going to wear. [For women’s], you’re designing for yourself, so you have a better idea of what you want. When you design a ladies’ shoe, say a classic pump, it’s one leather material and one silhouette.