Men’s Spring Predictions

J. Shoes
“Spring is inspired by an unstructured elegance. Classic silhouettes such as chukkas and loafers, as well as vintage styles from the not-too-distant past, are created from hand-finished leathers and canvas. Colors are soft and subdued, as though weathered with time. The emphasis is on natural tones, with navy and blue ash used as highlights. The craft story is a big influence, inspired by reclaimed industrial furniture and spaces, translating into finishings and details that include artisan leather soles.”
— Nick Drury, creative director and lead designer

Bed Stu
“Vintage Americana [work] and military trends will continue. Their importance is based on economic and social problems globally. These classic silhouettes [are detailed] in hand-finished leathers distressed with washing and aging processes for a worn, utilitarian feel. While earthy colors define this look, softer colors will be sprinkled in. In addition to leather, there’s canvas and suede [done in colorful] dyes to brighten the sandal and sneaker groups.”
— Roger Orozco, director of product development

Copy
“Spring’s luxury-sport feeling is interpreted in the Rider style, [ideal]
for riding a single-speed [bicycle] and hanging with friends. It combines technology with functionality. Suede and leather are mixed, with bungee cords and Velcro used to make this new 3/4 silhouette efficient and stylish. The reinforced toe and hidden laces create a luxury sneaker for the bike enthusiast.”
— Murphy Martines, president and head designer

Giant by Georgia Boot
“Our Hack Ripple collection is an example of our advanced vintage trend. It incorporates design elements from [authentic] ripple outsoles, while generating a new feel on the tread pattern. While uppers are classic, they incorporate unconventional [leather] treatments such as a roughed-out effect, semi-anilines with a natural hand and heavily waxed suede, all for an authentic period look. The line is built around an earthy palette, accented with tonal stitching and lacing. Although these looks hark back to the past, they incorporate plenty of comfort, with chukkas that feel like sneakers.”
— Jordan Anderson, designer

Bass
“[It’s all about] Americana classics with attitude. With the resurgence of heritage looks, we’ve had the chance to be playful with tried-and-true styles. Classic boat shoes are being reinterpreted into heavy-duty canvas with thick rubber soles. For a more modern take, a slip-on is done in white nubuck with dark-brown leather laces. Bucks are also in the mix, with a raw-edged, distressed canvas version.”
— Jim McCormick, president

Rock & Republic
“The focus is on reinventing classics into bad-ass shoes. [We’re] offering a marriage of past and future — from perforated oxfords, colored cork loafers and slick black monk straps to lethally sharp embellishments on street-styled sneakers and rugged leather boots. It’s the re-creation of footwear for the modern man.”
— Michael Ball, CEO and creative director

Lacoste
“The casual lifestyle theme continues, influenced by sport. Styles are inspired by nautical elements, such as whip-stitching on the vamp, leather laces and metal eyelets. Colors [include] dark browns, deep blues and black, with interest created through contrasts of suede and leather.”
— Ryan Lamont, creative director

Frye
“Spring is about hand-sewn and casual Americana looks with a worn, rugged feel. The collection utilizes vegetable-tanned leathers in a rich, earthy [color] palette for a series of handcrafted mocs in classic boat shoe and chukka silhouettes. This outdoorsy trend blends well with rolled-up dark jeans and a chambray shirt for a country weekend feel.”
— Michael Petry, design director

1999 by Zigi New York
“It’s all about sleek simplicity: classic patterns reborn through comfort elements, and once-clean lines now deconstructed or distressed. Unusual washes, raw-edge fabrics and coarse seams are an update from fall ’10. Sandals, casual sneakers and comfort casuals use canvas, burlap, jute and antiqued leathers. The color palette uses gray, charcoal, white, black, mustard and indigo.”
— Jannie Denney, creative director

Diesel
“The focus for the U.S. is on our Not for Running — Running Shoe. It’s a hybrid that takes inspiration from technical footwear, bringing comfort and style together for [easy] transition from day to night. Other hybrids include a boot and moccasin with sneaker soles, and a sneaker with a dress-shoe sole. Uppers incorporate distressed treatments, dyed fabrics and a range of washes. Color is always important, with more bright contrasts such as vibrant reds, greens and oranges against more-traditional blacks and browns.”
— Tony Strippoli, VP of sales, footwear, bags and kids

Clae
“Our modern footwear range is continuing, inspired by heritage sports to traditional dress shoes. For the athletic range, we’re using more technical fabrics, including nylon mesh for breathability and neoprene for better collar cushioning. Our boots use fine nubucks and suedes for a softer feel and more polished look. In addition, we’re incorporating new textures and fabrics, from textured herringbone to denim. The color palette is earthy, featuring sand and redwood, with muted pops in celery. There’s also a push into deep navy as a new staple in all [categories].”
— Sung Choi, creative director

Steve Madden
“Sockless footwear continues, from drivers to boat shoes to sneakers. Slip-ons [remain] the dominant profile, while ankle booties and chukkas will go further into spring than they have in the past. Gray remains a vital color, with browns and tans re-emerging with momentum from fall’s big boot focus. Attention is on texture and finishes, juxtaposing waxy finishes, garment-dyed treatments and hand burnishing against white outsoles. The overall effect is worn-in, well-earned comfort.”
— Joshua George, men’s product line manager

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